The Science of Decision Fatigue and How to Avoid Bad Decisions

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What the researchers found was that at the beginning of the day, a judge was likely to give a favorable ruling about 65 percent of the time. However, as the morning wore on and the judge became drained from making more and more decisions, the likelihood of a criminal getting a favorable ruling steadily dropped to zero. In a  research study  published by the National Academy of Sciences, psychologists examined the factors that impact whether or not a judge approves a criminal for parole.

 

 

  • All of the rulings were made by a parole board judge, whose job was to determine whether or not to allow the criminal to be released from prison on parole.
  • It didn’t matter what the crime was — murder, rape, theft, embezzlement — a criminal was much more likely to get a favorable response if their parole hearing was scheduled in the morning (or immediately after a food break) than if it was scheduled near the end of a long session.
  • The choices made by judges are impacted by all types of things that shouldn’t have an effect in the courtroom.

 

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Mind Body

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